REGION: Africa
COUNTRY: French West Africa (Togo)
YEAR PRINTED: 1965
VALUE: 100 francs

This banknote, issued by the French colonial government from 1959 until 1965, was intended for circulation in the French West African colonial territory, which encompassed modern Mauritania, Senegal, Mali, Guinea, Côte d’Ivoire, Burkina Faso, Benin, Togo, and Niger, until the federation collapsed in 1961. However, the Central Bank of West African States continued to issue this note for eight years more. The note depicts a young woman and a tribal mask of unknown type of the obverse, and on the reverse, a young woman and a coat of arms. This specific note was printed in Togo.

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REGION: Africa
COUNTRY: French West Africa
YEAR PRINTED: 1958
VALUE: 30, 45, 50, 65, 100 & 200 francs

These stamps were issued by the French colonial government in 1958 for the territory of French West Africa, a colonial empire ruled by the French from 1895 until 1960. It comprised modern Benin (then Dahomey), Burkina Faso (then Upper Volta), Côte d’Ivoire, Guinea, Mali (then French Sudan), Mauritania, Niger, and Senegal. At the time these stamps were issued, France had begun converting its African colonies to “territories” within a “Communauté française,” effectively a relationship of suzerainty. The relationship was short-lived, however, as African territories began insisting on sovereign independence, which was granted to each in rapid succession. The masks depicted are from the Yaure people of Côte d’Ivoire.

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REGION: Africa
COUNTRY: French West Africa
YEAR PRINTED: 1958
VALUE: 1, 3, 5, 10, 20 & 25 francs

These stamps were issued by the French colonial government in 1958 for the territory of French West Africa, a colonial empire ruled by the French from 1895 until 1960. It comprised modern Benin (then Dahomey), Burkina Faso (then Upper Volta), Côte d’Ivoire, Guinea, Mali (then French Sudan), Mauritania, Niger, and Senegal. At the time these stamps were issued, France had begun converting its African colonies to “territories” within a “Communauté française,” effectively a relationship of suzerainty. The relationship was short-lived, however, as African territories began insisting on sovereign independence, which was granted to each in rapid succession. The masks depicted are from the Yaure people of Côte d’Ivoire.

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